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Selling Wine Online Process 2: Conversion

On the previous post I looked at generating traffic to a wine eCommerce website. This post will look at converting that traffic. Following posts will look at Repeat Business and Order/Product Administration.

The Landing Page

As mentioned in the last post you should build your SEO and PPC campaigns so that people land on an individual page, the “landing page”, rather than just a general home page. There are a number of reasons for this but the key one is that your customer is hot on the trail of an attractive wine – and we don’t want to throw any obstacles in the way of that purchase – such as having to search the site.

That page should have a photo, description of the wine and any ratings or reviews.

Such a short sentence but such an important and significant job. In effect it’s you selling the wine in front of the customer. I’ve not mentioned vintage. I’ll leave that to its own post as its quite a difficult issue to do with individual SKUs, and and SEO issue to do with changing URLs every 12 months. I will say you should tell the customer what vintage you’re stocking and leave it at that.

Note also there are some legal issues to do with copyright, as I’m not a lawyer I’ll not pretend I can give legal advice.

General Pages and Navigation

If your customer is not landing on a page specific to their keyword search then you’ll need to be especially careful that your website has good internal search and navigation.

Indeed something called “filterable navigation” is most preferable. This is where people can click a menu item which then collapses to filter out the non relevant items (sometimes expands and highlights). So they may click on US>California>Napa Valley>Chardonay>$20 to $30>Silverado.

Other attributes or search items might include for example Gold Medal, 90-93 points, 5 stars, plum, full body etc etc.

Back to the product page. The customer clicks on the Buy Now button and goes to their shopping cart. They may continue shopping or go straight to checkout. Onto checkout…

One Page

There is a strong body of thought that you want the customer to have full visibility of how long the checkout process will take, and shorten it if need be. One page checkouts ensure that the customer can see it won’t take long to type in their details. Similarly you want to reduce the obstacles to purchase by ensuring,

  • they can checkout as a Guest rather than having to create a permanent account (privacy reasons)
  • shipping costs are upfront, perhaps even right up front in their cart as an estimate only.

Specific to the liqor retail industry you need a statement and tick box for them to legally confirm they are of legal age to purchase liqour (and perhaps other legal issues depending on your country and state).

I’ll cover more mundane administration issues in another post Administration

Conversion is the “hard yards” of selling wine online, what experiences have you had? Please comment below

Comments

  1. Hey Bruce, thanks for informative article, could you throw any numbers: like visitots->registrations->purchase convertions ? Thanks!

  2. BruceMcGechan says:

    Nothing that I can be sure of @MtotheB. I’d check out http://www.sitetuners.com/blog/ and http://www.conversion-rate-experts.com/blog/ blogs as they are the experts in this area

Trackbacks

  1. […] my post Conversion I outlined how the landing page should ideally be the product page that the customer is searching […]

  2. […] to sell wine online and I’ll do some posts on these in the coming days. These will be Conversion, Administration and then Repeat […]

  3. […] Conversion – convert this traffic into sales through probably good content, user shopping experience,  suitable wine range and fair prices […]

  4. […] comparison cart listings, maybe some social media (is anyone getting sales from this though?!) Conversion: great user experience delivered through navigation, search, reviews/ratings/recommendations and […]

  5. […] Then I then went through the process in a little more depth in the following posts: traffic, conversion, ecommerce administration and repeat […]

  6. […] the two previous posts I covered how wine retailers can generate traffic and convert it to sales. In this post I’ll cover ecommerce administration. In a fourth post I’ll cover repeat […]

  7. […] to sell wine online and I’ll do some posts on these in the coming days. These will be Conversion, Administration and then Repeat […]

  8. […] Conversion – convert this traffic into sales through probably good content, user shopping experience,  suitable wine range and fair prices […]

  9. […] Conversion – convert this traffic into sales through probably good content, user shopping experience,  suitable wine range and fair prices […]

  10. […] broken down the key steps for selling wine online: Traffic (this post) Conversion, Administration and then Repeat […]

  11. […] Then I then went through the process in a little more depth in the following posts: traffic, conversion, ecommerce administration and repeat […]

  12. […] comparison cart listings, maybe some social media (is anyone getting sales from this though?!) Conversion: great user experience delivered through navigation, search, reviews/ratings/recommendations and […]

  13. […] the two previous posts I covered how wine retailers can generate traffic and convert it to sales. In this post I’ll cover ecommerce administration. In a fourth post I’ll cover repeat […]

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